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What College Coaches Are Doing That Has Improved Their Program

Football coaches are always looking for small changes that can give their program an edge. Sometimes it is a small wrinkle on an old play, a different strength program, or a different way to manage staff responsibilities.

We asked hundreds of college coaches what they changed recently that has improved their program and we wanted to share some of the best answers with you.

Many colleges said that they are cutting down practice time to keep players fresh, healthy, and energized. The NCAA allows coaches to spend 20 hours per week with their athletes in season, and schools are shifting more of that time to meetings and training in order to keep players at their peak through a long season.

Several D3 coaches are making changes in the way they recruit. Jeff Pedersen, Head Coach at D3 Grinnell College in Iowa, added a recruiting coordinator to his staff.

Jeff Simmons, Special Teams Coordinator at D3 Carnegie Mellon in Pennsylvania,  alerted us to a new recruiting model that gets part-time coaches more involved. “We used to only have our full time coaches make phone calls to recruits.  Now we ask each position coach to recruit his own position.  It gives them more a sense of shopping for the groceries and cooking the food too.  Where before they were stuck with coaching whatever the full time coaches brought home.”

Mark Gibson, assistant coach at JUCO Cisco Community College in Texas, reports having success, “Bringing in midterm transfers from DI, IAA, and DII programs”.

Kean University (D3, New Jersey) Defensive Coordinator Matt Kreider said that getting more actively involved in their players' academics has helped their program. They have set up academic progress meetings.

Thank you to all of the coaches that participated in our surveys. The more coaches participate, the better we will be able to provide insights on new ways coaches can improve their programs.

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